Revija Centra za študij edukacijskih strategij

ISSN 2232-2647 (spletna izdaja); ISSN 1855-9719 (tiskana izdaja)
Pogostost izhajanja: 4 številke na leto
Vsebinsko področje: izobraževanje učiteljev, edukacijske vede
Založnik: Pedagoška fakulteta, Univerza v Ljubljani

Prva številka - Vol.1 | N°1 | Year 2011 (celotni pdf )

Contents

Editors’ Foreword
Editorial


Focus

Investigating the Effectiveness of a Dynamic Integrated Approach to Teacher Professional Development
Panayiotis Antoniou, Leonidas Kyriakides and Bert Creemers (pdf )

Educating Student Teachers to Become High Quality Professionals – A Finnish Case
Hannele Niemi (pdf )

Variations in Primary Teachers’ Responses and Development during Three Major Science In-Service Programmes
Tina Jarvis, Anthony Pell and Philip Hingley (pdf )

Innovating Science Teaching by Participatory Action Research – Reflections from an Interdisciplinary Project of Curriculum Innovation on Teaching about Climate Change
Timo Feierabend and Ingo Eilks (pdf )

Using Technology to Engage Preservice Elementary Teachers in Learning about Scientific Inquiry
Loretta L. Jones, James R. MacArthur and Sevil Akaygün (pdf )

Encouraging Teachers' and Students' Innovation with the Support of Teacher Learning Communities
Leonor Margalef García (pdf )

Exploring Culture in Locally Published English Textbooks for Primary Education in Turkey
Yasemin Kirkgöz and Reyhan Agçam (pdf )

Postgraduate Students’ Perception of Creativity in the Research Process
Mojca Juriševič (pdf )


Varia

Personal and Emotional Factors in the Labour Integration of University Graduates in the Field of Education. Implications for University Teaching
Juan L. Castejón, Raquel Gilar and Pablo Minano (pdf )


Reviews

Cirila Peklaj (Ed.), Teacher Competencies and Educational Goals.
Barica Marentič Požarnik (pdf )

Nan Henderson (Ed.), Resilience In Action: Practical Ideas for Overcoming Risks and Building Strengths in Youth, Families, and Communities.
Vanja R. Kiswarday (pdf )

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Contents

Editors’ Foreword

In a time of progressing globalisation and numerous changes in the area of education, grounded both nationally and internationally, from preschool to university level, educational research and discussion on open conceptual questions, as well as the communication of research results to a broad scientific audience, have become ever more important. It is on this background that a decision was made at the Faculty of Education of the University of Ljubljana to establish a journal aimed at encouraging international dialogue between researchers.

Introduction

The thematic focus of the first issue of the Centre for Educational Policy Studies Journal (CEPS) is educational innovation, one of the crucial starting points for quality educational work in today’s fast changing world. All over the world, there are many innovations in science and technology, changes in economics and politics, and transformations in demographical and social structures; the educational process needs to respond to these changes adequately. …

Eight articles in the present issue discuss educational innovations. There is one further contribution in the non-focused part of the journal. In the third part, there are reviews of two monographs.


Focus

Investigating the Effectiveness of a Dynamic Integrated Approach to Teacher Professional Development
Panayiotis Antoniou, Leonidas Kyriakides and Bert Creemers

ABSTRACT
This paper argues that research on teacher professional development could be integrated with validated theoretical models of educational effectiveness research (EER). A dynamic integrated approach (DIA) to teacher professional development is proposed. The methods and results of a study comparing the impact of the DIA and the Holistic - Reflective Approach (HA) to teacher professional development are presented. Teaching skills and teacher perceptions of teaching of 130 teachers and the achievement of their students (n=2356) were measured at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. Teachers found to be at a certain developmental stage were randomly allocated evenly into two groups. The first group employed the DIA and the second the HA. Teachers employing the DIA managed to improve their teaching skills more than teachers employing the HA. Teacher perceptions and attitudes towards teaching have not been modified due to their participation in the interventions. On the other hand, the use of DIA also had a significant impact on student achievement. Implications of findings for the use of EER for improvement purposes are drawn and suggestions for research and practice in teacher professional development are provided.

Keywords: Dynamic integrated approach, Educational effectiveness research stages of teaching skills, Evaluation of teacher improvement, Teacher professional development

Educating Student Teachers to Become High Quality Professionals – A Finnish Case
Hannele Niemi

ABSTRACT
For decades, the Finnish orientation toward teacher education has committed itself to the development of an inquiry oriented and research-based professional culture. The aims of teacher education are to train students to find and analyse problems they may expect to face in their future work. This study consists of a survey of student teachers (n=545) in two universities in Finland. Web-based surveys with quantitative and qualitative questions were sent to all student teachers in the beginning of May 2010. Students assessed how teacher education had provided them with the competences they need in a high standard profession, what kinds of active learning experiences they had in their TE studies, and how research studies of teacher education had contributed to their professional development. The participants of the study assessed that they had achieved good skills in planning teaching and curricula. They were capable of using different teaching methods. They were aware of their own teaching philosophy and their responsibilities as professionals and life-long learners. They consider the research component of TE valuable to their independent and critical thinking. They were very engaged in studies. Finnish pre-service teacher education seems to function very well and to be effective in providing the skills teachers need to work as independent professionals. The results of the study show, however, that students also need more supervision and guidance on how to collaborate with parents and other stakeholders outside school, such as representatives of working life as well as partners in business life and culture.

Keywords: Active learning, Professional development, Student teachers, Teacher education, Teachers

Variations in Primary Teachers’ Responses and Development during Three Major Science In-Service Programmes
Tina Jarvis, Anthony Pell and Philip Hingley

ABSTRACT
This paper reports on how different types of teachers responded to in-service aimed at developing investigative-based science education (IBSE) in primary schools, and the extent to which they applied their new skills in the classroom. Common items from evaluation questionnaires allowed data to be combined from three major in-service programmes. Using complete data sets from 120 teachers, cluster analysis enabled three teacher types to be identified: a small group of ‘science unsures’, with low attitude scores and little confidence, who showed no response to the innovation; ‘holistic improvers’, who showed the largest improvement in science teaching confidence; and ‘high level, positive progressives’, who were very positive to science teaching throughout and showed gains in confidence in teaching physics and chemistry, as well as in demonstrating the relevance of science to their pupils. Taking account of these teacher types alongside interviews and observations, nine developmental stages in how teachers apply their new expertise in the classroom and the whole school are suggested. Major factors influencing application in the classroom are the teachers’ initial science knowledge and pedagogical expertise, and motivating feedback to teachers when pupils responded positively to the innovation. Assessing teachers’ initial level of subject knowledge and science pedagogical expertise to inform the approach and amount of in-service provision is important. Subsequent mentoring as well as support from the school principal when teachers first try IBSE with pupils promotes successful implementation in the classroom.

Keywords: IBSE, In-service, Investigative-based science education, Motivation, Primary education

Innovating Science Teaching by Participatory Action Research – Reflections from an Interdisciplinary Project of Curriculum Innovation on Teaching about Climate Change
Timo Feierabend and Ingo Eilks

ABSTRACT
This paper describes a three-year curriculum innovation project on teaching about climate change. The innovation for this study focused on a socio-critical approach towards teaching climate change in four different teaching domains (biology, chemistry, physics and politics). The teaching itself explicitly aimed at general educational objectives, i.e., fostering students’ communication and evaluation abilities as essential components for preparing young people for active participation in society. Participatory Action Research has been used as a collaborative strategy of cyclical curriculum innovation and research. Using past experiences and selected results from accompanying research, this project and its methodology will be reflected upon from the viewpoint of the chemistry group taking part in the project. Core issues reflected upon include how the project contributed to the creation of feasible curriculum materials, how it led to innovative structures in practice, and whether it supported experienced teachers’ ongoing professional development. General considerations for the process of curriculum innovation will also be derived.

Keywords: Climate change, Curriculum innovation, Participatory action research, Science education

Using Technology to Engage Preservice Elementary Teachers in Learning about Scientific Inquiry
Loretta L. Jones, James R. MacArthur and Sevil Akaygün

ABSTRACT
Elementary teachers are often required to teach inquiry in their classrooms despite having had little exposure to inquiry learning themselves. In a capstone undergraduate science course preservice elementary teachers experience scientific inquiry through the completion of group projects, activities, readings and discussion, in order to develop a sense of how inquiry learning takes place. At the same time, they learn science content necessary for teacher licensure. The course exposes students to different pathways of scientific discovery and to the use of the computer both as a tool for conducting inquiry-based investigations and as a means of collecting and sharing student opinions. The students involved have many misconceptions about science and it is often difficult for them to distinguish science from pseudoscience. Computer simulations are used to help students understand that difference. In addition, a classroom response system using “clickers” is used to poll student opinions on controversial issues and to stimulate discussion.

Keywords: Classroom response systems, Clickers, Elementary science education, Scientific inquiry, Technology

Encouraging Teachers' and Students' Innovation with the Support of Teacher Learning Communities
Leonor Margalef García

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this paper is to share knowledge generated through the implementation of “Teaching Innovation Teams” as a strategy for teachers’ professional development and innovation at the University of Alcala (Spain). We analyse the contributions of this strategy to the facilitation of curriculum innovation in higher education and reflect on some of the achievements and results of the activities carried out by these teams, identifying the dilemmas and difficulties that teachers experienced and that hinder the development of curriculum innovations. Finally, we outline some educational contributions of Teaching Innovation Teams understood as a collaborative and formative strategy to facilitate educational change.

Keywords: Collaborative learning, Higher education, Professional development, Teacher learning communities, Training teachers

Exploring Culture in Locally Published English Textbooks for Primary Education in Turkey
Yasemin Kirkgöz and Reyhan Ağçam

ABSTRACT
Since language and culture are closely interwoven, the integration of culture into textbooks used for teaching English as a second/foreign language has become a widely accepted phenomenon. This study investigates the cultural elements in locally published English textbooks used for Turkish primary schools following two major curriculum innovations in ELT. A total of 18 textbooks, of which 8 were published after the 1997 curriculum innovation and 10 after the curriculum innovation introduced in 2005, were investigated to find out the extent to which textbooks contain references to the source (Turkish) culture, the target (British/American) culture and the international target culture. A quantitative analysis of the cultural elements demonstrated that while references to the source and target cultures included in textbooks published between 1997 and 2005 outnumber international target cultural components, a different trend was obtained in the cultural analysis of books published after the 2005 curriculum innovation. The study reveals that representations of the source culture, the target culture and the international target culture are favoured in locally produced ELT textbooks in a fairly balanced way.

Keywords: Cultural representations, Culture, EFL/ESL, International target culture, Source culture, Target culture, Textbooks

Postgraduate Students’ Perception of Creativity in the Research Process
Mojca Juriševič

ABSTRACT
The purpose of the research was, with the aid of a short questionnaire, to determine how postgraduate students (N = 32) perceive the opportunities for creative research in general, and how they perceive creativity in the preparation of their own research work in particular. Descriptive analysis shows that students (1) perceive a positive study-research climate that encourages creative processes (independence, motivation, intellectual challenges), (2) judge that researchers have numerous opportunities for creative work in the various phases of research and (3) evaluate themselves as highly creative individuals in everyday life. Students perceive themselves as being at their most creative in the definition of the research problem, which they mainly identify with the use of personal strategies (work experience) and take various lengths of time to form, typically up to one year. The most difficult problem in this regard is represented by giving meaning to the problem (breadth, depth, specificity, application). Amongst the perceived encouragement with which mentors motivate students for creative research the most frequent is less directive general guidance in study and research. On the basis of the presented findings, guidelines are suggested for the more effective encouragement of creative research in postgraduate students.

Keywords: Postgraduate study, Research, Research problem, Scientific creativity.


Varia

Personal and Emotional Factors in the Labour Integration of University Graduates in the Field of Education. Implications for University Teaching
Juan L. Castejón, Raquel Gilar and Pablo Miñano

ABSTRACT
The main aim of this paper is to analyse the role of intellectual, personal and emotional competencies as well as technical knowledge - academic achievement - in the employment of university graduates, with the purpose of incorporating these competencies into training programmes developed within the European Framework of Higher Education. This study is based on an initial sample of 118 university graduates in the field of education. We have gathered information about academic achievement and the intellectual, personal and emotional traits of this sample. From these data, and given the importance of non-intellectual aspects of intelligence associated with professional success, the specific contribution -incremental validity - of personal and emotional intelligence in explaining the employment - labour integration - of university graduates in the field of education is studied. From this point onwards, we attempt to identify the key socio-emotional competencies in the field of education in order to establish the implications of including this type of skills in university training programmes within the European Higher Education Area.

Keywords: Emotional intelligence, Labour integratio,n Personality, University education of teachers


Reviews

Cirila Peklaj (Ed.), Teacher Competencies and Educational Goals.
Barica Marentič Požarnik

The monograph, written by a group of five Slovenian experts: C. Peklaj, J. Kalin, S. Pečjak, M. Puklek Levpušček and M. Valenčič Zuljan, from the fields of educational and developmental psychology and teaching methods (didactics), deals with an area that is enjoying increasing attention, the area of teacher competencies. Teachers are regarded, perhaps too optimistically, as “a driving force of social development”. One of the central problems is the question as to which competencies teachers need in order to promote students’ overall development, enabling them to prosper in the complex world of tomorrow. Thus the main goal of the monograph is to contribute to a better understanding of the intricate relations between teachers’ competencies, student achievement and their socioemotional development, through interrelated variables such as teaching methods, classroom climate and management.

Nan Henderson (Ed.), Resilience In Action: Practical Ideas for Overcoming Risks and Building Strengths in Youth, Families, and Communities.
Vanja R. Kiswarday

The book Resiliency in Action aims to share and promote practical means and evidence derived from recent scientific research findings on resiliency. Contributors with different backgrounds and experience with resiliency (scientific researchers, professionals, individuals, schools, and communities) challenge the deficit-based approach towards a paradigm shift that fosters resiliency approach and focus sights on communicating “What is right with you is more powerful than anything that is wrong with you” (p. vi). Contextually, the book is divided into seven parts: The Foundations of Resiliency; Resiliency and Schools; Resiliency and Communities; Resiliency Connections: Mentoring, Support and Counselling; Resiliency and Youth Development; Resiliency and Families; and Resiliency and the Brain.

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