Revija Centra za študij edukacijskih strategij

ISSN 2232-2647 (spletna izdaja); ISSN 1855-9719 (tiskana izdaja)
Pogostost izhajanja: 4 številke na leto
Vsebinsko področje: izobraževanje učiteljev, edukacijske vede
Založnik: Pedagoška fakulteta, Univerza v Ljubljani

Četrta številka - Vol.1 | N°4 | Year 2011 (full pdf )

Contents

Editorial


Focus

In-Service Science Teachers’ Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Confidences and Views about Technology-Rich Environments
Samozaupanje učiteljev naravoslovja v njihovo tehnološkopedagoško znanje in njihova stališča do tehnološko bogatih okolij
Betul Timur and Mehmet Fatih Taşar (pdf )

Student Engagement with a Science Simulation: Aspects that Matter
Interakcija študentov z naravoslovnimi simulacijami: pomembni vidiki
Susan Rodrigues and Eugene Gvozdenko (pdf )

Exploring the Impact of and Perceptions about Interactive, Self-Explaining Environments in Molecular-Level Animations
Študija vpliva in zaznavanja interaktivnih samorazlagalnih okolij animacij molekularne ravni
David A. Falvo, Michael J. Urban, and Jerry P. Suits (pdf )

Visualisation of Animals by Children: How Do They See Birds?
Vizualizacija živali pri otrocih: kako vidijo ptiče?
Sue Dale Tunnicliffe (pdf )


Varia

Building Partner Cooperation between Teachers and Parents
Graditev partnerskega sodelovanja med učitelji in starši
Barbara Šteh and Jana Kalin (pdf )


Reviews

Valenčič Zuljan, M. and Vogrinc, J. (Eds.), Facilitating Effective Student Learning through Teacher Research and Innovation
Barica Marentič Požarnik (pdf )

Tomšič Čerkez, B. and Zupančič, D., Play Space [Prostor igre]
Borut Juvanec (pdf )

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Contents

Editorial
Iztok Devetak

The thematic focus of the fourth issue of the CEPS Journal is visualisation in education. Thus the main purpose of this issue is the presentation of the use of visualisation elements in different areas of education. The submitted papers were mostly from the field of science education, and the review of the manuscripts resulted in only papers from science education being published.
Visualisation in education relates to a specific way of teaching and learning content in various subject areas (natural sciences, mathematics, social sciences, languages, art) with the aid of specific images. With the assistance of visualisation elements, so-called visual learning takes place. This encompasses a familiarity with systems of symbols within scientific disciplines and the development of an ability to interpret the meaning of a particular concept with the use of these systems, all of which are presented with some kind of representation. The following content areas are presented in the papers published in this issue of the CEPS Journal: (1) visual representation as a tool for: (a) illustrating concepts, (b) problem solving, © explaining ideas, (d) assisting individuals’ mental models of concepts and their integration into the individuals’ already existing mental scheme of the concepts, and (e) identifying and changing misconceptions; and (2) the importance of different ICT visualisation approaches in the process of learning.


Focus

In-Service Science Teachers’ Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Confidences and Views about Technology-Rich Environments
Samozaupanje učiteljev naravoslovja v njihovo tehnološkopedagoško znanje in njihova stališča do tehnološko bogatih okolij
Betul Timur and Mehmet Fatih Taşar

ABSTRACT
Today’s computers and related technologies have an important role in enabling visualisations of the workings of various scientific concepts, natural phenomena and mechanisms by creating technology-rich environments (TRE). TRE offer opportunities to science teachers in cases of natural phenomena that might be difficult or impossible to view, dangerous to conduct experiments about, impractical or too expensive to bring into the classroom, or too messy or time consuming to prepare in a school laboratory. However, science teaching cannot and should not be undertaken entirely by TRE. Science teachers need to know how to integrate technology into science classrooms. Measuring science teachers’ confidence in technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) and identifying their views about using TRE in science instruction is an important issue. The present study aims to address challenges faced by in-service science teachers when creating TRE and gives suggestions for successful technology integration into science teaching. The data were gathered through a TPCK confidence survey and subsequent interviews. The results show that in-service science teachers have a low level of confidence in using technology during science teaching. The teachers surveyed stressed their need for professional development activities regarding the effective and meaningful use of TRE in science teaching.

Keywords: In-service teachers, Mixed methods research, Teacher confidence, Technological pedagogical content knowledge, Technology-rich environments

Student Engagement with a Science Simulation: Aspects that Matter
Interakcija študentov z naravoslovnimi simulacijami: pomembni vidiki
Susan Rodrigues and Eugene Gvozdenko

ABSTRACT
It is argued that multimedia technology affords an opportunity to better visualise complex relationships often seen in chemistry. This paper describes the influence of chemistry simulation design facets on user progress through a simulation. Three versions of an acid-base titration simulation were randomly allocated to 36 volunteers to examine their interactions with the simulation. The impact of design alterations on the total number of interactions and their patterns was analysed for the following factors: (a) the place of a feature on the screen, (b) alignment of the sequence of instructions, © additional instruction before the simulation, (d) interactivity of a feature. Additionally, interactions between individual factors, such as age, prior experience with science simulations and computer games, perception of the difficulty of science simulations, and general subject knowledge, on one hand, and the efficiency of using the simulation, on the other hand, were examined. The findings suggest that: (a) centrality of the position of an element significantly affects the number of interactions with the element, (b) re-arranging the sequence of instructions on the screen in left-to-right order improves the following of instructions, © providing users with additional written advice to follow numbered instructions does not have a significant impact on student behaviour, (d) interactivity of a feature was found to have a strong positive correlation with the number of interactions with that feature, which warrants a caution about unnecessary interactivity that may hinder simulation efficiency. Surprisingly, neither prior knowledge of chemistry nor the age of the participants had a significant effect on either the number of interactions or the ability to follow on-screen instructions.

Keywords: Chemistry, Educational simulations, Learning, Instructions, Interactivity, Simulation design

Exploring the Impact of and Perceptions about Interactive, Self-Explaining Environments in Molecular-Level Animations
Študija vpliva in zaznavanja interaktivnih samorazlagalnih okolij animacij molekularne ravni
David A. Falvo, Michael J. Urban, and Jerry P. Suits

ABSTRACT
This mixed-method study investigates the effects of interactivity in animations of a molecular-level process and explores perceptions about the animated learning tool used. Treatments were based on principles of cognitive psychology designed to study the main effects of treatment and spatial ability and their interaction. Results with students (n=189) showed that science majors scored higher than non-science majors in retention measures (i.e., structure and function) but not in transfer. Significant main effects were found for treatment in function questions and spatial ability in structure questions. There was a significant interaction between treatment and spatial ability in structure questions. Additionally, in this study participants believed the key and the motion of ions and molecules were the most helpful parts of the animation. This study shows that students perceive the animations as being supportive of their learning, suggesting that animations do have a role in science classrooms.

Keywords: Interactive learning environments, Simulations, Visualisations

Visualisation of Animals by Children: How Do They See Birds?
Vizualizacija živali pri otrocih: kako vidijo ptiče?
Sue Dale Tunnicliffe

ABSTRACT
Children learn to recognise animals from their earliest years through actual sightings in their own observations of their world, but also through second-hand representations in various forms of media. Young learners begin with a template specimen to which they refer when they see another animal that resembles it, naming the animal accordingly. Gradually, they learn to distinguish members of the subordinate category – bird in the case of the present paper – into subcategories. Accessing their mental model through drawings is one means of discerning their interpretation of both phyla and species. If children of increasing ages are studied, a rationale for the understanding of a such concepts may be forthcoming. The present study investigated children from 6 years to 14 years though interviews, as well as through the drawings on which the paper focuses. As children mature, they observe more and more details about the birds that they see, thus increasing their knowledge not from school but from their own observations outside school.

Keywords: Children’s drawings, Children’s understanding of birds


Varia

Building Partner Cooperation between Teachers and Parents
Graditev partnerskega sodelovanja med učitelji in starši
Barbara Šteh and Jana Kalin

ABSTRACT
This paper presents the goals of teacher-parent cooperation, various potential models for establishing mutual cooperation, and the conditions required to achieve quality interactive cooperation. The partnership model is highlighted as an optimal model of interactive cooperation between teachers and parents, as it includes the distribution of expertise and control with the purpose of ensuring optimal education for children. It enables the creation of an interactive working relationship in which all of those involved are respected and recognised in their efforts to achieve common goals.
The second part presents the findings of an empirical study carried out on a representative sample of Slovene primary schools. Teachers (N = 467) and parents (N = 1,690) were asked to express their opinions about the need for mutual cooperation, their view of each other when fulfilling their respective roles, and where they perceive the main obstacles to mutual cooperation. It became evident that teachers and parents have doubts about each other’s competence. This does not form a solid base on which to establish and build the necessary partner relationship, and along with it mutual cooperation. Yet both groups to a large extent agree that teacher-parent cooperation is both necessary and useful. This gives rise to the question as to how to ensure that schools adopt policies promoting opportunities for better understanding, for building quality mutual relations and for parents to become more actively involved.

Keywords: Models of mutual cooperation, Obstacles to cooperation, Partnership model, Teachers and parents


Reviews

Valenčič Zuljan, M. and Vogrinc, J. (Eds.), Facilitating Effective Student Learning through Teacher Research and Innovation
Barica Marentič Požarnik

The 20 studies in this monograph, contributed by authors from 13 different countries and four continents (most of the contributions are the result of collaboration between two or more authors), represent a variety of topics, methodological approaches and findings. The studies span the whole school system – from primary through secondary to higher education, (such as the contribution by Maciejowska and Frankowicz, which describes a model of introducing innovative approaches into the teaching of university professors); they range from small-scale innovations, limited to one lecture room (such as the experiment of Rodicio and Sanchez on improving explanations) to nationwide attempts to innovate teaching (such as fostering teacher innovation in chemistry teaching in Tailand, by Coll et al.).
In spite of their differences, all of the studies start from a common, very important question: How can innovations brought about by teacher research lead to deeper, more effective learning and better student results? Tightly connected to this is the further question: How can academic researchers help teachers to improve their qualifications for becoming researchers of their own practice?

Tomšič Čerkez, B. and Zupančič, D., Play Space [Prostor igre]
Borut Juvanec

Children are our future, play is their work. Work strengthens children and develops their capacities, skills and thinking. So it matters how a child plays. Above all, it matters where s/he plays, how s/he grasps the environment, since play connected with a space encourages discoveries. In a restricted, dark, badly organised space that is poorly articulated, a child cannot develop a feeling for clear thinking, for wide recognition, for relations between people, for freedom of thought.
So the space in which a child lives, and in which s/he works, is very important.
Not a lot of books have been written about play, especially not in the field of architecture, the design of space. The present publication is not just a handbook on the theme of play and planning playgrounds; as well as reviewing existing solutions in the world, it analyses them, considers them and proposes further solutions.

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