Revija Centra za študij edukacijskih strategij

ISSN 2232-2647 (spletna izdaja); ISSN 1855-9719 (tiskana izdaja)
Pogostost izhajanja: 4 številke na leto
Vsebinsko področje: izobraževanje učiteljev, edukacijske vede
Založnik: Pedagoška fakulteta, Univerza v Ljubljani

Vol.2 | N°1 | Year 2012 (full pdf )

Contents

Editorial


Focus

The Family-School Relationships in Europe: A Research Review
Odnos med družino in šolo v Evropi – pregled raziskav
Paola Dusi (pdf )

Approaches to Building Teacher-Parent Cooperation
Pristopi k oblikovanju sodelovanja med učitelji in starši
Franc Cankar, Tomi Deutsch and Sonja Sentočnik (pdf )

The Management of Parental Involvement in Multicultural Schools in South Africa: A Case Study
Menedžment vključevanja staršev v multikulturne šole v Južnoafriški republiki: študija primera
Sathiapama Michael, Charl C. Wolhuter and Noleen van Wyk (pdf )

Reconstructing Parents’ Meetings in Primary Schools: The Teacher as Expert, the Parent as Advocate and the Pupil as Self-Advocate
Prenova sestankov s starši v osnovni šoli – učitelj kot strokovnjak, starši kot zagovorniki in učenec kot samozagovornik
Gillian Inglis (pdf )

Cooperation Between Migrant Parents and Teachers in School: A Resource?
Sodelovanje med starši migranti in učitelji
Martha Lea (pdf )


Varia

The Role and Potential Dangers of Visualisation When Learning About Sub-Microscopic Explanations in Chemistry Education
Vloga in potencialne nevarnosti vizualizacije pri učenju submikroskopskih razlag pri pouku kemije
Ingo Eilks, Torsten Witteck and Verena Pietzner (pdf )


Reviews

Christenson, S. and Reschly, A. (Eds.), Handbook of School-Family Partnership
John W. Eagle and Shannon Dowd-Eagle (pdf )

———————————

Contents

Editorial
Jana Kalin and Mojca Peček Čuk

The thematic focus of the present edition of the CEPS Journal is the cooperation of school with parents. This is an area that is extremely important from the perspective of ensuring the overall development of pupils, providing optimal conditions for development and learning, encouraging learning and for the achievement of other educational goals. Various empirical studies confirm that it is important to attract parents to cooperation with school and teachers, in order to comprehensively encourage the child’s development (Burden, 1995; Gonzalez- eHass, Willems, & Doan Holbein, 2005; Henderson & Berla, 1994; Hornby 2000; Jordan, Orozco, & Averett, 2001; Pomerantz, Moorman, & Litwack, 2007; Soo-Yin, 2003). Researchers have confirmed that the overall involvement of parents represents a positive contribution to learning and the learning achievements of pupils (Hendeson & Berla, 1994; Hoover-Dempsey & Sandler, 1997 in Gonzalez-DeHass et al., 2005). These studies prove there is a close relationship between the involvement of parents and the learning achievement of pupils, their wellbeing, their attendance at school, their views, their homework assignments, their school marks and their educational aspirations.


Focus

The Family-School Relationships in Europe: A Research Review
Odnos med družino in šolo v Evropi – pregled raziskav
Paola Dusi

ABSTRACT
The literature on research carried out in the field and parents’ and teachers’ declarations all point in the same direction: good collaboration between home and school is useful to the child-student for his education and learning. Despite this, parent-teacher relationships in Europe (and elsewhere), from Spain to Sweden, from Ireland to Greece, and from Italy to the Czech Republic, represent an unresolved issue. This is a complex relationship that calls into play various social spheres: macro (social), intermediary (institutional) and micro (relational); in fact, there are as many diverse realities as there are schools. In Europe, the relationship between individual behaviours (parents vs. teachers), social orientations (neoliberalism) and institutional frameworks (school markets) appears significant: scarce parental participation, lack of adequate forms of home-school communications, and the need to make investments in parent and teacher training. Nevertheless, family and school are called on to create a dialogue in order to contribute to the processes of training new generations. They both need ach other in order to carry out that task in the best way. This paper presents and iscusses the results of a theoretical analysis conducted on the basis of the nternational literature concerning research on the school-family relationship, ith particular attention on the situation of different European countries, and concludes with suggestions for some practical improvements.

Keywords: Benefits and difficulties, European perspective, Individual
behaviour, Institutional frameworks, School-family relationship, Social
orientations

Approaches to Building Teacher-Parent Cooperation
Pristopi k oblikovanju sodelovanja med učitelji in starši
Franc Cankar, Tomi Deutsch and Sonja Sentočnik

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to explore the areas of cooperation in which parent and teacher expectations were the same and where they differed. Data were obtained from a sample of 55 randomly selected primary schools. We analyzed school-to home communications, parental influence on school decisions, and parent involvement in different school activities. At the same time, we also explored building ooperation among the teachers, students, and their parents, within the framework of the program ‘Reading and Conversation’. The findings indicated that the third- and ninth- grade lead teachers were mostly in agreement about the importance of parent involvement and as such represented a fairly homogenous group. The hird-grade lead teachers were more open about actual involvement of parents in instruction than their ninth-grade colleagues, who were more cautious and restrained. In contrast to the lead teachers who represented a relatively narrow professional group, parents’ views were much more diverse. Parental education was he best predictor of their readiness to become involved in the life and work of heir children’s school. Whether the area in which the families lived was urban or uburban did not make any difference. The evaluation of the one-year ‘Reading and Conversation’ programme revealed increases in parents’motivation to collaborate ith the school as a consequence of the program’s approach to work, as well as mprovement in mutual relationships and dialogue.

Keywords: Parents, Primary school, School-to-home communications,
Teachers

The Management of Parental Involvement in Multicultural Schools in South Africa: A Case Study
Menedžment vključevanja staršev v multikulturne šole v Južnoafriški republiki: študija primera
Sathiapama Michael, Charl C. Wolhuter and Noleen van Wyk

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to investigate the management of parental involvement in three multicultural schools in the Umlazi District in Durban, South Africa. A iterature survey resulting in a theoretical framework on parental involvement in chools, multicultural schools, and the managing of parental involvement in schools has been done. The contextual background of schools in contemporary South Africa s depicted. A qualitative research design has been used. Focus group discussions have been conducted, with a total of thirty-three principals, teachers and arents. It has found that there is a low level of meaningful contact between school and parents. Apathy exists on the side of parents, low expectations on the side of principals and teachers, and an organisational structure facilitating arent-school interaction is lacking. In managing parental involvement in ulticultural schools, school managers display a lack of intercultural sensitivity.

Keywords: Multicultural schools, Parent involvement, Qualitative
research, School Management, South African case study

Reconstructing Parents’ Meetings in Primary Schools: The Teacher as Expert, the Parent as Advocate and the Pupil as Self-Advocate
Prenova sestankov s starši v osnovni šoli – učitelj kot strokovnjak, starši kot zagovorniki in učenec kot samozagovornik
Gillian Inglis

ABSTRACT
The efficacy of parents’ meetings in primary schools in the UK is an area in need of research. This article uses an approach informed by grounded theory to explore the experiences and satisfaction of parents, teachers and pupils regarding bi-annual meetings to discuss pupil progress. A two-phase approach was utilised, with diary-interviews with parents and teachers and group pupil interviews in Phase 1, followed by a parents’ questionnaire in Phase 2 derived from Phase 1 ata. The findings from a doctoral study provide an overall more positive depiction of these meetings compared to existing research in the secondary sector. A model of the teacher as the expert and information-giver persists, but a consumerist ideology appears evident as parents seek to participate and advocate on behalf of their child. As parents become more proactive and teachers act to retain their professional authority, the interaction of the professional and advocate has excluded the perspective of the child. This leaves pupils in search of elf-advocacy at meetings in which they are the object of discussion, but cannot be present. While pupils generally favour involvement, adults express a protectionist perspective on pupil exclusion with exceptional factors indicated as being the age of the child and the content of the meeting.

Keywords: Advocacy, Parents’ meetings, Parents’ evenings, Pupil
participation

Cooperation Between Migrant Parents and Teachers in School: A Resource?
Sodelovanje med starši migranti in učitelji
Martha Lea

ABSTRACT
Even smaller Western countries receive immigrants from remote areas with poorer living conditions. As stated in the U.N. Child Convention, immigrant children should be given equal opportunities in education. Parents are always interested in their children’s future, and education may gain from stronger cooperation between school and parents. Some research shows that even illiterate parents may support their children’s training in a second language (Cummins, 1986/2001, p. 665). Dialogues between teachers and parents promote mutual understanding and increase parents’ knowledge of school and society. This might make the parents trust society more, enhance their acculturation and reduce future intergenerational conflicts (Portes & Rumbaut, 2001). A professional teacher needs cultural knowledge and understanding in order to give her/his students an education adapted to their needs. Migrant students especially should feel that there is coherence in their education, because cultural conflicts sap their energy and may also cause identity problems and lead to lack of motivation. For teachers it is important that education policy provides for equal opportunities. Norway has an inclusive policy concerning immigrant children. The students have language support to a certain degree both in their mother tongue and in Norwegian when needed. Parents and schools are obliged to cooperate in education, and some support is therefore given to translation. Cooperation is required by conferences and meetings. There are gains for all parties in cooperation between school and migrant parents, but it
is difficult to develop mutual cultural understanding for all students and equal opportunities for migrant students. This requires a clear school policy, the means to implement it, and teacher competence. It takes a process to learn how to cooperate and give adequate support. The Norwegian policy shows a will to cooperation, but the implementation of the policy can still be improved.

Keywords: Cooperation school/migrant parents, Dialogue teacher/parents,
Multicultural schools, School policy for migrant students


Varia

The Role and Potential Dangers of Visualisation When Learning About Sub-Microscopic Explanations in Chemistry Education
Vloga in potencialne nevarnosti vizualizacije pri učenju submikroskopskih razlag pri pouku kemije
Ingo Eilks, Torsten Witteck and Verena Pietzner

ABSTRACT
The core of theory-driven chemistry education consists of the constant shift between the different representational domains of chemical thinking: the macroscopic, the sub-microscopic, and the symbolic domains. Because the sub-microscopic domain can neither be seen nor directly visualised, it requires specific forms of visualisation, i.e. pictures and animations illustrating the model-based level of discrete particles, atoms, or molecular structures. This paper considers the central role visualisations play when learning about the model-based, sub-microscopic level, but it also reflects the dangers inherent in employing insufficiently examined, poorly considered, or even misleading visualisations. This is outlined using different examples taken from both textbooks for lower secondary chemistry education (for students aged 10 to 15) and from the internet. Implications for structuring and using sub-micro visualisations
in chemistry education are also given.

Keywords: Chemistry education, Representational levels, Students’
misconceptions, Visualisation


Reviews

Christenson, S. and Reschly, A. (Eds.), Handbook of School-Family Partnershi
John W. Eagle and Shannon Dowd-Eagle

The Handbook of School-Family Partnerships provides a comprehensive review of theory, research and practice as it relates to meaningful collaboration between families and schools. It is divided into three sections: (I) the theoretical and empirical underpinnings of partnerships, (II) partnership considerations across developmental levels, and (III) the establishment of a research agenda to inform policy and practice. The editors provided a synthesis of themes that were evident in all chapters included in the text:
• It is critical to understand and appreciate the role culture plays in the development of positive home-school partnerships.
• Numerous evidence-based home-school interventions exist that promote the academic, behavioural and social-emotional competence of students across developmental levels.
• Effective home-school relationships are predicated upon the belief that families are part of the solution in enhancing student outcomes. They are not the problem.
• The development of constructive partnerships across the primary systems in a child’s life is necessary to minimise educational disparities.
• The conditions that support effective cross-setting connections are clear and grounded in research.
• Additional research, particularly related to the terminology, measurement, design and the generalisation of effective practices, is needed.
• It is time to promote a comprehensive, systematic and continuous approach
for home-school partnerships.

sl/volumes/2012-vol2-no1.txt · Zadnja sprememba: 17:18 16.11.2012 objava psjstr01
Sled: 2012-vol2-no1